North Coast Nurses Coalition, Inc. - Diversity: Don't just talk about it, Be about it!
Events
Saturday, November 4, 2017
Join us at South Euclid-Lyndhurst Library for
A FREE seminar
"Let's Talk About Sugar"
An Update on Diabetic Management
1876 South Green
South Euclid, Ohio 44121
10:00am-1:30pm
Continental breakfast
Register at northcoastnursescoalition@gmail.com

Holiday 2017
Sunday, December 10, 2017
Scholarship Fundraiser
Mediterranean Party Center
25021 Rockside Road
"T'Was The Jazz
Before Christmas"
It's always a great time
for a great cause and
The Dave Crawford Project will be back with soulful live music

Tickets are $25 per person
includes live jazz, door prizes
appetizers, dessert and glass of wine. PLUS a gift shopping opportunity: check out our theme basket silent auction!

Mail payment to the P.O. Box
below by 11/30/17
or see any member for tickets.
Questions? Contact us at northcoastnursecoalition@gmail.com 

Watch our website for exciting programs and upcoming continuing education opportunities . We offer many presentations at no cost
to attendees.

We have a rolling membership all
year long. Come out and be a part of
the change in  health advocacy. Membership dues are $50 annually and all  health based professionals
and students are welcome

North Coast Nurses Coalition, Inc. 
P. O. Box 18477
Cleveland Hts., Ohio 44118
 northcoastnursescoalition@gmail.com
 
Fall 2017 Health Tips
Here are eight easy ways to remain healthy and fit throughout the fall…

1. Make Time for Exercise
Suddenly that free hour or two you had all summer long is taken up by picking the kids up from school or driving them to soccer practice.  Regardless, your health is worth shifting your schedule— leave a bit early from work to hit the gym or take a walk.

2. Focus Meals Around Fresh, Local Produce
 To avoid piling on hibernation weight, focus your meals on fresh local produce—such as squash, beets, apples, pumpkin, Brussels sprouts, and kale—to ensure you’re getting some essential vitamins and nutrients in those crock pot meals.

3. Adjust Workout Attire For the Temperature Change
Dress for the temperatures. Get yourself a snazzy running jacket and gloves, and splurge for those new shoes you’ve had your eye on. Staying active and outside in fall will help you combat the affects of Seasonal Affective Disorder (or SADs) known as the "fall blues".

4. Make Healthy Comfort Food
Sure cheesy casseroles are great in autumn, but what you really want are hot, hearty meals. Luckily, you can still do that with your health in mind via your crock pot. Prepare thick stews and soups using autumn’s healthy vegetables. Stay away from temptations to load up on cream and cheese-based sauces.

5. Reboot That Immune System
Protecting yourself from the risk of a fall cold or flu can be tricky at this time of year when everyone at the office starts to come down with a nasty cough. Get enough sleep is crucial to an efficient immune system. Inadequate sleep and too much stress will only leave you susceptible to illness if a cold virus is making the rounds.

6. Eat Breakfast Every Day
You already know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day—thanks mom. That means, if you make time to eat a nutritious breakfast (i.e., oatmeal, fruit, and yogurt) your glucose levels will remain balanced and you’ll be less prone to mid-morning sugar cravings.

7. Relish the Beauty of Fall
Just because the weather is cooler and damper doesn’t mean you should hibernate inside until spring.  The cooler weather is also prime for hiking, bike rides, raking leaves (OK, maybe not), walking the dog, and playing with the kids.

8. Protect Yourself Against Influenza
Fall season (aka flu season) takes all the prisoners it can. Influenza and cold viruses are extremely contagious in crowded places—like the office, school, grocery store, and even among family members. That’s why it’s important to protect yourself from contracting the flu by getting your annual flu shot and by maintaining vigilance in the face of a spreading cold. So get those wet wipes out and be sure to clean any surfaces (i.e., work phones, computers, kitchen counters) that may have been sneezed or touched by someone with the flu.

 







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